Just Drop IT

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. ”  The Notebooks of Lazarus Long, Robert A. Heinlein.

This excerpt reminds me of the great pressure we put upon ourselves to be “perfect”-diligent, resourceful, competent and clever. Multi-tasking has been a dream that all have aspired to in our current day and age. But is it really making us better and more efficient humans? “Survey SaysX!” (Family Feud game show allusion)

Attention switching, aka multi-tasking, has now been proven to make us actually less productive and switched off than ever.And this attention residue lingers when you switch from one task to another, making it harder to focus on either effectively.

Lately I’ve been inspired by the idea of deep work–work which is rare and valuable to produce because of the intense focus and emphasis you put into it; it is produced through blocks of time dedicated to it. And what I find some fascinating is how wonderful it is for our brains–we get a myelin workout whenever we remove distractions and pay attention intensely to a task at hand. Turn off the phone and the device cartoonnotifications and banging out a project or task with a single-minded purpose is quintessential–not just for our productivity but also our brains.

Mindfulness is brain candy? Turns out to be so–and I love this!

 

Moreover, not only is mindfulness handy  with completing work, but also in our social interactions. UCLA scientists found that sixth-graders who went five days without even glancing at a smartphone, television or other digital screen did substantially better at reading human emotions than sixth-graders from the same school who continued to spend hours each day looking at their electronic devices. (Learn more: reading emotion in digital communication ).  So it seems that just dropping your need to be on your device temporarily can make you more connected–not just to your work but to others around you. Seems like a simple solution in a complicated world.

So this week, I’m honoring my commitment to be present and switching off so I can switch on.

 

 

 

Habit Forming

There’s nothing more motivational than developing positive momentum. Since there are areas of my life that I wish to improve,  I read the book The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg.  This book really inspired me to think about keystone habits and how I might cultivate them. Since then, I’ve really been researching ways that I might be more successful at converting a new habit into something that becomes second nature. Obviously my practice of mindfulness is a habit that I am working on. Habits-101-Poster

With that in mind, I found a couple of things that have really inspired me and kept me on track:

  • The wisdom shared by Brian Johnson in his video: Habits 101.
  • And this tracker: Way of Life app ( I only use the free version because 3 habits seem like plenty of cultivate at a time.)

These two things have really helped me to sculpt my intention to develop positive habits like meditation, and have also given me a way to celebrate my success as I endeavor to become the best me that I can be. I hope these tools serve you as well.

Keep breathing!